Tour de France winners, 1903 - 2018

The modern era of professional cycling is dominated by sports science and ‘marginal gains’. Whilst individual stage performances continue to bring excitement, separating the main ‘GC’ contenders each year is increasingly difficult compared to the individual dominance of winners from decades past.

Small screen! Sorry, but if you're reading this you're probably using a mobile or tablet device. This data visualisation has not yet been optimised for viewing on mobile or tablet devices, and hence the experience will probably not be great. :-(

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Explanation
  • Each winner is represented by a circle.
  • The size of the circle represents the time difference of their winning margin.
  • Blue circles represent a maximum statistic e.g. most number of stages in the lead.
  • Pink circles represent a minimum statistic e.g. fewest number of stages won.
  • Dark circles represent a winner who was subsequently disqualified. Sorry Lance. That means you.
Analysis
  • In recent decades, the number of stages won and the size of winning margin is increasingly small.
  • Only two winners have ever lead every stage throughout the race – Nicolas Frantz (1928) and Antonin Magne (1934).
  • Conversely, two winners have won despite leading for only one stage of the race – Jean Robic (1947) and Jan Janssen (1968).
  • One winner has twice won 8 individual stages – Eddie Merckx (1970 & 1974).
  • Seven cyclists have won the race without winning an individual stage – most recently Chris Froome (2017).
  • The smallest winning margin is 8 seconds – Greg Lemond (1989).
  • The largest winning margin of nearly 3 hours was in the first ever race – Maurice Garin (1903).
About the data
Possible future enhancements
  • Add in 2018 data!
  • Add the ability to filter riders by country.
  • Add a legend to visually explain the different colours.
  • Visually represent the ‘min/max’ state in the popover for clearer understanding of which attribute it refers to.
  • Add a ‘disqualified’ state for relevant winners (e.g. Lance Armstrong).
  • Add a counter for number of winners in total and by country.
  • Add a mountain illustration to the graph background.
  • Calculate the total number of wins per rider as a comparable statistic.
  • Optimise the visualisation for mobile and tablet display.
  • Do the same for the other two Grand Tours (Giro and Vuelta)! On the same graph? Probably be too dense.
  • Show if winners also won another classification e.g. young rider, points or mountain points classification.