Exploring who donates world aid

As part of the March ’19 Storytelling with Data challenge, the large AidData dataset is used to explore who donates world aid and how much. The initial graph gives a high-level overview of total donations and donation trends from 1947-2013. The subsequent graph then shows who has donated each year and how much.

About the data
  • The data used for the challenge and related details are on the AidData website.
  • Data was restructured and processed using MySQL, and regenerated as JSON.
  • The data visualisations are custom-built using D3.js, drawing upon many community-provided resources.

Total donations and trends from 1947-2013

Small screen! Sorry, but if you're reading this you're probably using a mobile or tablet device. This data visualisation has not yet been optimised for viewing on mobile or tablet devices, and hence the experience will probably not be great. :-(

Reading the graph
  • The yellow bars represent the total amount donated each year.
  • The green trend-line shows the total number of donations each year.
  • The pink trend-line shows the average donation amount each year.
  • The blue trend-line shows the maximum donation amount each year.
What does it show?
  • The total donation amount peaked in 2009 and 2010.
  • As the number of donations each year has steadily increased, the average donation amount has decreased.
  • The highest single donation was in 2002.

Ranked donors from 1947-2013

Small screen! Sorry, but if you're reading this you're probably using a mobile or tablet device. This data visualisation has not yet been optimised for viewing on mobile or tablet devices, and hence the experience will probably not be great. :-(

Reading the graph
  • Each block represents a donor’s contribution for a year, ranked from top to bottom.
  • Green blocks represent countries and pink blocks represent organisations.
  • The darkness of the block colour represents the amount donated, where darker is a larger amount.
What does it show?
  • Until 2007 the number of donors each year was increasing, though this has since declined.
  • Major organisations such as the World Bank or International Monetary Fund have consistently been the largest donors.
  • Donors outside the top 10 give comparatively similar amounts (e.g. less than $5 billion!) whereas the top 5 donors represent exponentially more.
  • The USA and Japan are by far the largest country donors, followed increasingly by Germany in recent years.

Further features and enhancements

  • Finish styling the tooltips
  • Replace placeholder tooltip content with relevant dynamic content.
  • Implement member name/type lookup from data subset.
  • Fix the headache-inducing hover interaction bugs!
  • Add legend hint to Graph A axis labels.
  • Add value labels to top of bars in Graph A.
  • Add legends to both graphs.
  • Add a small hint to both Graph A y axes to provide a more understandable example of a value.
  • Add some dynamic top-level statistics.
  • Add trend lines to Graph B on hovering/clicking on a member (e.g. like a ‘proper’ bump chart).
  • Colour the Graph B matrix blocks by donation range.
  • Differentiate country and organisation donors in Graph B.
  • Add a checkbox to toggle the display of annotations on/off.
  • Do some browser testing (especially Edge and IE).
  • Fix the big ES6 #fail in IE!!!
  • Optimise the visualisation for mobile and tablet display.
  • Finish Graph C showing who donated to whom!
  • Start and finish Graph D showing how the donations were used (e.g. their intended purpose)!